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1  Hearn, Samuel (I554)
 
2

Earl of Eu of Ewe. one source says he died in 1426. 
Bourchier, William Comte D'Eu Sir (I2555)
 
3

John of Gaunt. Duke of Aquitaine. Earl of Richmond
Titular King of Castile & Leon. May have died Oct 21, 1425

John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster (1340-99), English soldier and statesman, the fourth son of King Edward III of England, and brother of Edward, the Black Prince. John was born in March 1340 in Ghent (M.E., Gaunt), now in Belgium. In 1359 he married Blanche, daughter of Henry, duke of Lancaster; when Henry died, John became duke.John of Gaunt played an important part in the wars of the period between England and France and between England and Spain. He commanded a division of the English army, led by the Black Prince, that defeated the army of Henry (later Henry II, king of Castile and León) at Nájera in 1367. As a result of his second marriage, to Constance, daughter of Peter the Cruel (king of Castile and León), John laid claim to the throne of Castile. During the Hundred Years' War, he aided (1370-71) the Black Prince against France and established English rule over most of southern France. After a severe illness forced the return of the Black Prince to England, John took command of the English armies; by 1380 he had lost much of the territory the English had previously won. In 1386 John invaded Castile, but was defeated by John I, king of Castile and León. John of Gaunt gave up his claim to Castile and León in 1387, when his daughter married Henry, later Henry III, king of Castile and León.John of Gaunt was also prominent in English affairs. Together with Alice Perrers, his father's mistress, John dominated the English government. He was opposed by Parliament and by the Black Prince. In 1376 Parliament banished Alice Perrers and curtailed John's powers. The death of the Black Prince that year and the dissolution of Parliament, however, enabled John to regain his power. In 1377, on the death of Edward III and the accession of Richard II (John's nephew and son of the Black Prince), John gave up his control of the government and thereafter played the role of peacemaker; he also supported the king, by whom he was made (1390) duke of Aquitaine. In 1396, after the death of his second wife, John married his mistress Catherine Swynford, and Richard legitimized their children the following year. Saddened by the exile (1398) of his son, Henry of Lancaster (later King Henry IV of England), John died on February 3 of the following year.
"John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster," Microsoft(R) Encarta(R) 98 Encyclopedia. (c) 1993-1997 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved. 
England, John "Of Gaunt" [Duke Of Lancaster (I2017)
 
4

Maud; married 1st 1199 Theobald Fitz Walter and had issue; married 2nd1207 Fulk Fitz Warin. [Burke's Peerage]

Maud; married 1st 1199 Theobald Fitz Walter and had issue; married 2nd1207 Fulk Fitz Warin. [Burke's Peerage]

--------------

(i) By this lady [Robert le Vavasour's 1st wife] he had a daughter Maud,who m. 1stly, Theobald Walter, ancestor of the Butlers, later Earls ofOrmund, and 2ndly, in 1207, Fulk FitzWarin. [Complete Peerage XII/2:231note (i)] 
Vavasour, Maud Edlington Heiress Edlington (I2479)
 
5

Richard FitzRoy (died in or after 1232) by Rose, daughter and heiress ofRobert of Dover, illegitimate son of King John. [Burke's Peerage]

Richard Fitz Roy, natural son of King John by a daughter of the Earl of Warenne (perhaps a daughter of Hamelin Plantagenet); married Rohese, died1264/5, daughter of Fulbert of Dover. [Ancestral Roots] 
FitzRoy, Richard , Baron of Chilham (I2302)
 
6

Titles include Baron Ingmanthorpe. 
Ros, William 11 De Brn Ingmanthorpe,sir (I2638)
 
7
! Complete Peerage I-24 I-244

Married Kings Chapel, Havering-atte-Bower, Essex, England

According to John Young, the marriage of Richard "Copped Hat" FitzAlan
and Isabel le Despencer was contracted at the age of 7 or 8 years of age.
The Church annulled the marriage so that FitzAlan could marry his second
wife, and Edmund and his two sisters were made ilegitimate, and could not
inherit:

The 3 children-Edmund and his 2 sisters were still properly born children (when
they were married) of Earl Richard "Copped Hat" FitzAlan and Lady
Despencer. This is the reasons that Edmund styled himself De
Arundel- by heir right he should have become the next Earl. He was
knighted though and was not cast fully aside

. Burke in error shows him a brother of his father- Cokayne is correct and details it in his
footnotes."

Burke has death date 24 Jan 1375 for Richard

Richard Fitz Alan, 10th/3rd Earl of Arundel, as which restored 1331 (confirmation 1351 and 1354), getting Arundel Castle back also Dec 1330-31 from the widow of Edmund Earl of Kent; after the death of his maternal uncle the 8th Earl of Surrey's widow 31 Aug 1361, Richard assumed the additional title of 9th Earl of Surrey; known as "Copped Hat"; born c1313; Justiciar of North Wales for life 1334, Governor of Carnarvon Castle 1339, Sheriff of Salop for life 1345; Admiral of the West 1340-41 and 1345-47; commanded 2nd division at Crecy 1346 and assisted at taking of Calais 1347; married 1st 9 Feb 1320/1 (annulled 4 Dec 1344) Isabel, daughter of 1st Lord (Baron) le Despenser of the 29 July 1314 creation, and had issue (bastardised by the papal annulment of 1344); married 2nd 5 Feb 1344/5 his mistress Eleanor, daughter of the 3rd Earl of Lancaster (ggs of Henry III) of the 1267 investiture (by his wife Maud de Chaworth) and widow of the 2nd Lord (Baron) Beaumont, and died 24 Jan 1375/6. [Burke's Peerage]

Richard Fitz-Alan, b. 1306, who being restored by parliament, 4th Edward III [1331], had the castle of Arundel (which had been given to Edmund, Earl of Kent, the king's uncle) rendered to him, and thus became 9th earl. In the 7th Edward III [1334], this nobleman was constituted governor of Chirke Castle, co. Denbigh, and the ensuing year had a grant of the inheritance of that castle, with all the territories thereunto belonging, being part of the possessions of Roger Mortimer, the attainted Earl of March; he was soon afterwards made governor of Porchester Castle, and the same year had a command in the wars of Scotland, where he continued engaged for some years. After this he was constituted admiral of the western seas, and governor of Caernarvon Castle. In the 14th Edward III [1341], his lordship embarked in the French wars, and participated in the glories of the subsequent campaigns. He was at the siege of Vannes, the relief of Thouars, and the immortal battle of Cressy. Besides his great military services, the earl was frequently employed in diplomatic missions of the first importance, and was esteemed one of the most eminent generals and statesmen of the era in which he lived. His lordship, who, with his other honours, had the Garter, contracted in minority and under constraint, marriage with Isabel, dau. of Hugh le Despencer, and had issue by her, an only dau., Philippa, m. to Sir Richard Sergeaux, Knt., of Cornwall. In 1345, he was divorced from this lady, and m. Lady Eleanor Plantagenet, dau. of Henry, Earl of Lancaster, and widow of John, Baron Beaumont, by whom he had issue, Richard, his successor; John, marshal of England in 1377, summoned to parliament 1st to 3rd Richard II. he d. 1379, having m. Eleanor, grand-dau. and co-heir of John, Lord Maltravers, in whose right he bore that title; Thomas, called Arundel, successively bishop of Ely, archbishop of York, and archbishop of Canterbury, Lord Chancellor of England; Joane, m. to Humphrey de Bohun, Earl of Hereford; Alice, m. to Thomas Holland, Earl of Kent; Mary, m. to John, Lord Strange, of Blackmere; and Eleanor, m. to Robert, son of William de Ufford, Earl of Suffolk. His lordship d. in 1376, and was s. by his eldest son, Richard Fitz-Alan, 10th Earl of Arundel. [Sir Bernard Burke, Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages, Burke's Peerage, Ltd., London, 1883, p. 200, Fitz-Alan, Earls of Arundel, Barons Maltravers] 
Fitzalan, Richard II "Copped Hat" Earl Arundel (I2077)
 
8
"The evidence... suggests that Margery married Giles before 1239 andlived until 1267, when Giles is mentioned, but was probably dead byc.1274, when her son Reginald appears (there is no doubt that Reginaldwas of age by 1267). Judging by Jordan de Sackville's OxfordshireInquisition Post Mortem, and others quoted by Phillips, his son Andrewwas born 9 October 1253, at which date Margery was certainly married toGiles de Argentein. Andrew de Sackville does not appear in connectionwith the property until c.1282 (although Blomefield (vol.2, pp.181,183;vol.8, pp.412,413) gives some references vaguely dated 'temp.Henry III',in fact they must be later). The later records quoted by Phillips must bein error (Andrew perhaps being changed from 'successor' of Margery intoher 'heir').

One other feature of Margery's (who married Giles de Argentein) ancestrydisclosed by the evidence above is that her mother was Margery, thedaughter of William de Fresney, and not, as usually stated, Agatha, thedaughter and coheir of Fulk de Beaufo (Blomefield, vol.2, p.178, vol.8,pp 412,413; Farrer, vol.3, p.111). Note that Phillips makes this Agathathe mother, not the wife, of Robert Aguillon, which would resolve theproblem.

Blomefield = F.Blomefield, An Essay Towards a Topographical History ofthe County of Norfolk; continued by C.Parkin (2nd edn, 1805-10).

Farrer = W.Farrer, Honors and Knights' Fees (1923).
Phillips = C.J.Phillips, History of the Sackville Family (1929), vol.1,p.61." [Ref: The marriage of Giles de Argentein to Margery, daughter ofRobert Aguillonhttp://www.medievalgenealogy.org.uk/families/arg/argbiog.shtml]

----------------------




---------------------- 
Aguillon, MARGERY DE (I2583)
 
9
1194 - WAS A WITNESS TO A CHARTER OF HARVEY BAGOT
1214 - BOUGHT LARGE ESTATES FROM ELEANOR MALBANK
1217 TO 1220 - UNDER SHERIFF OF SALOP AND COUNTY STAFFORD
1223 TO 1246 - IN COMMAND OF THE WELSH MARCHES
1223 - FOUNDED HULTON ABBEY
1227 TO 1232 - SHERIFF OF SALOP AND COUNTY STAFFORD
1227 - ACQUIRED THE MANORS OF EDGMUND AND NEWPORT, SALOP
1230 - ACQUIRED THE MANOR OF FORD, SALOP ALL OF THE ABOVE HELD BY HIM DIRECT
FROM THE CROWN, THOUGH NOT BE MILITARY OR KNIGHT SERVICE HE BUILT THE CASTLE OF
HELEIGH, COUNTY STAFFORD AND RED CASTLE, SALOP 22 JUN 1237 - APPOINTED
CUSTODIAN OF CHESTER AND BEESTON CASTLE ON THE EXTINCTION OF THE EARLDOM OF
CHESTER


"That this family of Alditheley, vulgarly called Audley," says Dugdale,"came to be great and eminent, the ensuing discourse will sufficientlymanifest: but that the rise thereof was no higher than King John's time,and that the first who assumed this surname was a branch of that ancientand noble family of Verdon, whose chief seat was at Alton Castle in thenorthern part of Staffordshire, I am very inclined to believe; partly byreason that Henry had the inheritance of Alditheley given him by Nicholasde Verdon, who d. in the 16th Henry III [1232], or near that time; andpartly for that he bore for his arms the same ordinary as Vernon did. ..so that probably the ancestor of this Henry first seated himself atAlditheley: for that there hath been an ancient mansion there, the largemoat, northwards from the parish church there (somewhat less than afurlong, and upon the chief part of a fair ascent), do sufficientlymanifest."

Henry de Alditheley, to whom Dugdale alludes above, being in great favourwith Ranulph, Earl of Chester and Lincoln (the most powerful subject ofEngland in his time), obtained from that nobleman a grant of Newhall inCheshire with manors in Staffordshire and other parts--and for hisadhesion to King John, in that monarch's struggle with theinsurrectionary barons, a royal grant of the lordship of Storton inWarwickshire, part of the possessions of Roger de Summerville. In thefirst four years of King Henry III [1216-1220], he executed the office ofsheriff for the counties of Salop and Stafford as deputy for his patron,the great Earl Ranulph. In the 10th of Henry III [1226], this Henry deAlditheley was appointed governor of the castles of Carmarthen andCardigan and made sheriff the next year of the counties of Salop andStafford and constable of the castles of Salop and Bridgenorth, whichsheriffalty he held for five years. Upon his retirement from office, hehad a confirmation of all such lands whereof he was then possessed aswell those granted to him by Ranulph, Earl of Chester, and Nicholas deVerdon, as those in Ireland given him by Hugh de Lacy, Earl of Ulster,whose constable he was in that province. He subsequently obtained diversother territorial grants from the crown, but, notwithstanding, whenRichard Mareschall, Earl of Pembroke, rebelled and made an incursion intoWales, the king, Henry III, thought it prudent to secure the persons ofthis Henry and all the other barons-marchers. He was afterwards, however,constituted governor of Shrewsbury in place of John de Lacy, Earl ofLincoln, and, on the death of John, Earl of Chester, governor of thecastle of Chester, and also that of Beeston, then called the "Castle onthe Rock," and soon after made governor of Newcastle-under-Lyne. Thispowerful feudal baron m. Bertred, dau. of Ralph de Meisnil-warin, ofCheshire, and had a son, James, and a dau., Emme, who m. Griffith apMadoc, Lord of Bromefield, a person of great power in Wales. He d. in1236, having founded and endowed the Abbey of Hilton near to his castleat Heleigh, in Staffordshire, for Cistercian monks, and was s. by hisson, James de Alditheley. [Sir Bernard Burke, Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeitedand Extinct Peerages, Burke's Peerage, Ltd., London, England, 1883, p.15, Audley, Barons Audley, of Heleigh]

"That this family of Alditheley, vulgarly called Audley," says Dugdale,"came to be great and eminent, the ensuing discourse will sufficientlymanifest: but that the rise thereof was no higher than King John's time,and that the first who assumed this surname was a branch of that ancientand noble family of Verdon, whose chief seat was at Alton Castle in thenorthern part of Staffordshire, I am very inclined to believe; partly byreason that Henry had the inheritance of Alditheley given him by Nicholasde Verdon, who d. in the 16th Henry III [1232], or near that time; andpartly for that he bore for his arms the same ordinary as Vernon did. ..so that probably the ancestor of this Henry first seated himself atAlditheley: for that there hath been an ancient mansion there, the largemoat, northwards from the parish church there (somewhat less than afurlong, and upon the chief part of a fair ascent), do sufficientlymanifest."

Henry de Alditheley, to whom Dugdale alludes above, being in great favourwith Ranulph, Earl of Chester and Lincoln (the most powerful subject ofEngland in his time), obtained from that nobleman a grant of Newhall inCheshire with manors in Staffordshire and other parts--and for hisadhesion to King John, in that monarch's struggle with theinsurrectionary barons, a royal grant of the lordship of Storton inWarwickshire, part of the possessions of Roger de Summerville. In thefirst four years of King Henry III [1216-1220], he executed the office ofsheriff for the counties of Salop and Stafford as deputy for his patron,the great Earl Ranulph. In the 10th of Henry III [1226], this Henry deAlditheley was appointed governor of the castles of Carmarthen andCardigan and made sheriff the next year of the counties of Salop andStafford and constable of the castles of Salop and Bridgenorth, whichsheriffalty he held for five years. Upon his retirement from office, hehad a confirmation of all such lands whereof he was then possessed aswell those granted to him by Ranulph, Earl of Chester, and Nicholas deVerdon, as those in Ireland given him by Hugh de Lacy, Earl of Ulster,whose constable he was in that province. He subsequently obtained diversother territorial grants from the crown, but, notwithstanding, whenRichard Mareschall, Earl of Pembroke, rebelled and made an incursion intoWales, the king, Henry III, thought it prudent to secure the persons ofthis Henry and all the other barons-marchers. He was afterwards, however,constituted governor of Shrewsbury in place of John de Lacy, Earl ofLincoln, and, on the death of John, Earl of Chester, governor of thecastle of Chester, and also that of Beeston, then called the "Castle onthe Rock," and soon after made governor of Newcastle-under-Lyne. Thispowerful feudal baron m. Bertred, dau. of Ralph de Meisnil-warin, ofCheshire, and had a son, James, and a dau., Emme, who m. Griffith apMadoc, Lord of Bromefield, a person of great power in Wales. He d. in1236, having founded and endowed the Abbey of Hilton near to his castleat Heleigh, in Staffordshire, for Cistercian monks, and was s. by hisson, James de Alditheley. [Sir Bernard Burke, Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeitedand Extinct Peerages, Burke's Peerage, Ltd., London, England, 1883, p.15, Audley, Barons Audley, of Heleigh] 
Audley, Henry de , Sheriff of Staffordshire (I2475)
 
10
5th baron of hamlake castle 
Ros, William 1 De Baron Hamlake MP,LORD HELMSLEY,SIR (I2637)
 
11
Desperate for information on Stewart and Montgomery Families of Allegeheny Co., Pennsylvania. Your assistance would be most appreciated. Thanks


Desperate for information on Stewart and Montgomery Families of Allegeheny Co., Pennsylvania. Your assistance would be most appreciated. Thanks


Desperate for information on Stewart and Montgomery Families of Allegeheny Co., Pennsylvania. Your assistance would be most appreciated. Thanks 
PLANTAGENET, MAUD "Of Lancaster" (I2843)
 
12
Desperate for information on Stewart and Montgomery Families of Allegeheny Co., Pennsylvania. Your assistance would be most appreciated. Thanks

Copyrighted but use freely for your self and families
Not to be sent to for profit company's 
UMFREVILLE, GILBERT DE (I2421)
 
13
Desperate for information on Stewart and Montgomery Families of Allegeheny Co., Pennsylvania. Your assistance would be most appreciated. Thanks

Mary (born c1321; died 1 Sep 1362), 6th and youngest daughter of Henry,3rd Earl of Lancaster of the 1267 creation (2nd son of Edmund Crouchback,1st Earl of Lancaster, 2nd son of Henry III). [Burke's Peerage] 
Plantagenet, Mary Baroness Percy (I2410)
 
14
Desperate for information on Stewart and Montgomery Families of Allegeheny Co., Pennsylvania. Your assistance would be most appreciated. Thanks 
HOLLAND, JAN I, COUNT (I2401)
 
15
Desperate for information on Stewart and Montgomery Families of Allegeheny Co., Pennsylvania. Your assistance would be most appreciated. Thanks 
Fitzalan, Catherine (I2404)
 
16
Desperate for information on Stewart and Montgomery Families of Allegeheny Co., Pennsylvania. Your assistance would be most appreciated. Thanks 
PLANTAGENET, BLANCHE (I2411)
 
17
Desperate for information on Stewart and Montgomery Families of Allegeheny Co., Pennsylvania. Your assistance would be most appreciated. Thanks 
Fitz Alan, Isabel Lady Strange (I2688)
 
18
Earldom of Pemborke: Nevertheless Henry III's half-brother William deValence, who married a niece of these last five [all sons of WilliamMarshal, who died dspl] Earls of Pembroke, is sometimes referred to bycontemporary sources as Earl of Pembroke. His Aspirations in thatdirection were promoted by the fact that Henry III had presented him withPembroke Castle. In addition de Valence's widow Joan by dint of usage,plus inheritance of the feudal Lordship of Pembroke, came to be known asCountess of Pembroke. And their son, Aymer de Valence, who was no moreformally created Earl of Pembroke than his father had been, wasnevertheless coming to be generally recognized as Earl of Pembroke bysome ten years after his father's death. Aymer's wife founded PembrokeCollege Cambridge. [Burke's Peerage, p. 2217]

William de Valence, styled but never invested as Earl of Pembroke.[Burke's Peerage]

Lord Valence, Crusader 6 Mar 1250.

---------------------------

Earldom of Pemborke: Nevertheless Henry III's half-brother William deValence, who married a niece of these last five [all sons of WilliamMarshal, who died dspl] Earls of Pembroke, is sometimes referred to bycontemporary sources as Earl of Pembroke. His Aspirations in thatdirection were promoted by the fact that Henry III had presented him withPembroke Castle. In addition de Valence's widow Joan by dint of usage,plus inheritance of the feudal Lordship of Pembroke, came to be known asCountess of Pembroke. And their son, Aymer de Valence, who was no moreformally created Earl of Pembroke than his father had been, wasnevertheless coming to be generally recognized as Earl of Pembroke bysome ten years after his father's death. Aymer's wife founded PembrokeCollege Cambridge. [Burke's Peerage, p. 2217] 
Valence, LORD William de , Earl of Pembroke (I2314)
 
19
Gilbert de Clare, 7th Earl of Hereford and 3rd Earl of Gloucester,married Joan of Acre, daughter of Edward I, King of England, and Eleanorof Castile.
Source: Browning's Magna Charta Barons and Their Descendants, pp. 94-96,122-3, 305. 
Clare, Gilbert "the-Red-Earl" de [Earl Of Glouces (I2415)
 
20
He was hanged, drawn and quartered at Hereford. King's Chamberlain 1313, banished with his father in 1321 by the Barons; they hated him for his wealth and rapacity. Recalled by the king in 1322; negotiator of truce with Scotland in 1323; taken with the King in 1326 by the Barons under Queen Isabella and hanged.

has been called Earl of Gloucester by some writers but The Complete Peerage
vol.V,p715 makes it clear he was not. Executed. ?????
The Complete Peerage vol.IV.pp.267-271

Hugh le Despenser ("The Younger Despenser"), 1st Lord (Baron) leDespenser of the 29 July 1314 creation, KB, associated with his father inthe period of ascendancy over Edward II in the early 1320's but reckonedmore deserving than his father of the hatred of the generality of thebaronial class; convicted as a traitor and hanged 29 Nov 1326, when allhis honours were forfeited. [Burke's Peerage]

--------------------------------------------------------------

Sir Hugh le Despenser, hanged and quartered 24 Nov 1326, Lord Despenser;m. 1306 aft. 14 June, Alianore de Clare (34-5). [Magna Charta Sureties]

--------------------------------------------------------------

Hugh and his father were favorites of King Edward II (a weak king) andhelped him throw off the mastery of Thomas, Earl of Lancaster. Edward'sreliance on the Despenser's drew the ire of his wife Isabel. She hadbecome the mistress of Roger de Mortimer while on a diplomatic mission toFrance. In September 1326 the couple invaded England, executed theDespensers, and deposed Edward II in favor of his son, Edward III. Isabelwas rumored to be involved in her husband Edward II's murder. SeeEncyclopedia Britannica, Edward II. 
DESPENSER, Sir Hugh IV le Earl of Winchester (I2241)
 
21
He [Robert de St. John] is said to have married Agnes, daughter ofWilliam DE CAUNTELO. He appears to have died between 11 March 1266/7 andthe 25th of that month. His widow (h) married, before 4 June 1271, JohnDE TURVILLE; they were both living in 1279. [Complete Peerage XI:322-3,(transcribed by Dave Utzinger)]

(h) Her marriage was granted, 3 Feb 1269/70 to William Belet, and boughtby William la Zouche.

Agnes, daughter of William de Cauntelo, d. 1251, of Calne, co. Wilts, andEaton Bray, co. Bedford, & Millicent de Gournay. [Ancestral Roots]

---------------------------

.

Ancestral File Number: 9XQZ-GW 
Cantelou, Agnes de (I2205)
 
22
Knight of the garter. 
Howard, John Lord Earl Marshal of England, K.G. (I2654)
 
23
Seal to Parents: 28 JAN 1943 SGEOR - St. George, UT 
ENGLAND, Lionel Plantaganet Duke Clarence, Knt Garter (I2280)
 
24
This file contains my adopted and biological family. It also contains my husband's family. It also has my Mayflower connection. 
Stafford, Thomas DE (I2560)
 
25
This file contains my adopted and biological family. It also contains my husband's family. It also has my Mayflower connection. 
Clifford, Maud DE (I2561)
 
26
This nobleman, William de Beauchamp, feudal Lord of Elmley, attended KingHenry III, in the 37th year of his reign [1253], into Gascoigne, and intwo years afterwards marched under the banner of Robert de Clare, Earl of Gloucester, against the Scots. In the 41st of the same reign, he had summons (with other illustrious persons) to meet the king at Chester onthe feast day of St Peter de Vincula, well fitted with horse and arms to oppose the incursions of Llewellyn, Prince of Wales. Lord Beauchamp m.Isabel, dau. of William Mauduit, of Hanslape, co. Bucks, heritable chamberlain of the exchequer, and sister and heiress of William Mauduit,Earl of Warwick (who inherited that dignity from his cousin, Margery deNewburgh, Countess of Warwick, in the year 1263). His lordship made his will in 1268, the year in which he died. Besides the daus. mentioned above [there are no daughters named in this article], Lord Beauchamp leftfour sons, viz., William; John, of Holt, co. Worcester; Walter, of Powykeand Alcester; Thomas, d. s. p. [Sir Bernard Burke, Dormant and ExtinctPeerages, Burke's Peerage, Ltd., London, 1883, p. 30, Beauchamp, Earls ofWarwick]


William de Beauchamp, of Elmley, Worcs; Hereditary Sheriff of Worcs andPantler (officer responsible for the bread) at the King's Coronation(died between 7 Jan and 21 April 1268). [Burke's Peerage]

--------------------------------- 
Beauchamp, William Earl Warwick 5th Baron (I2461)
 
27

Guy de Beauchamp, 2nd earl, so called in memory of his celebratedpredecessor, the Saxon, Guy, Earl of Warwick. This nobleman acquired highmilitary renown in the martial reign of Edward I, distinguishing himselfat the battle of Falkirk, for which he was rewarded with extensive grantsof land in Scotland, at the siege of Caerlaverock, and upon differentoccasions besides beyond the sea. In the reign of Edward II, he likewiseplayed a very prominent part. In 1310 his lordship was in the commissionappointed by parliament to draw up regulations for "the well governing ofthe kingdom and of the king's household" in consequence of the corruptinfluence exercised at that period by Piers Gaveston in the affairs ofthe realm through the unbounded partiality of the king; and in two yearsafterwards, when that unhappy favorite fell into the hands of his enemiesupon the surrender of Scarborough Castle, his lordship violently seizedupon his person and, after a summary trial, caused him to be beheaded atBlacklow Hill, near Warwick. The earl's hostility to Gaveston is said tohave been much increased by learning that the favourite had nicknamed him"the Black Dog of Ardenne." For this unwarrantable proceeding, hislordship and all the others concerned therein received within two yearsthe royal pardon, but he is supposed to have eventually perished bypoison, administered in revenge by the partisans of Gaveston. The earl m.Alice, relict of Thomas de Laybourne, dau. (by Lady Alice de Bohun) ofRalph de Toni, of Flamsted, co. Herts, and sister and heiress of Robertde Toni, by whom he had issue, Thomas, his successor; John, a veryeminent person in the reign of Edward III, being captain of Calais,admiral of the fleet, standard bearer at Cressy, one of the originalknights of the Garter, and summoned to parliament as a Baron, but dyings. p., the dignity expired; Maud, m. to Geoffrey, Lord Say; Emma, m. toRowland Odingsels; Isabel, m. to John Clinton; Elizabeth, m. to SirThomas Astley, Knt.; Lucia, m. to Robert or Roger de Napton.

This great Earl of Warwick was, like most of the nobles of his time, amunificent benefactor to the church, having bestowed lands upon severalreligious houses and founded a chantry of priests at his manor of Elmley.His will bears date "at Warwick Castle* on Monday next after the feast ofSt. James the Apostle, an. 1315," and by it he bequests to Alice his wifea proportion of his plate, with a crystal cup, and half his bedding; asalso, all the vestments and books belonging to his chapel; the othermoiety of his beds, rings, and jewels, his gives to his daus. To his sonThomas, his best coat of mail, helmet, and suit of harness; to his sonJohn, his second suit of mail, &c., appointing that all the rest of hisarmour, bows, and other warlike provisions should remain in WarwickCastle for his heir. Alice, widow of the earl, had very extensive estatesassigned to her in dowry in the November following the death of herhusband, and in the next year she paid a fine of 500 marks for license tomarry William la Zouche, of Ashby, co. Leicester, to whom she wasaccordingly married. The earl d. at Warwick Castle on 12 August, 1315,and was s. by his eldest son, then but two years of age, Thomas deBeauchamp.

* Warwick Castle was almost rebuilt by Thomas, 4th Earl of Warwick, and Richard, his heir and successor, in the reigns of Edward III and RichardII. The much admired polygon, Guy's Tower, which is thirty-eight feet indiameter and one hundred and six feet in height, was erected, it is said,by the latter. [Sir Bernard Burke, Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited andExtinct Peerages, Burke's Peerage Ltd, London, England, 1883, p. 30,Beauchamp, Earls of Warwick]

Guy de Beauchamp, 10th Earl of Warwick; born c1270; Hereditary Sheriff ofWorcs and Pantler at Coronations; knighted 1296, fought in Edward I'sdivision at victory over Scots of Falkirk 1298, at Sieges of Carlaverock1300 and Stirling Castle 1394; for services such as these was grantedBarnard Castle, Co Durham, Feb 1306/7; one of the chief opponents ofEdward II's favourite Piers Gaveston; married 1st by 11 May 1297(annulled, possibly due to non-completion or even non-consummation), asher 1st husband, Lady Isabel de Clare (married 2nd c1316, as his 2ndwife, 2nd Lord (Baron) Berkeley), daughter of 6th Earl of Gloucester andHertford of the 1122 creation; married 2nd Jan or Feb 1309/10 Alice (bornc1283; married 3rd by 25 Feb 1316/7, as his 1st wife, 1st Lord (Baron)Zouche of Richard's Castle, Mortimer or Ashby) and died just before 8 Jan1324/5), sister of 1st and last Lord Baron (Tony) and widow of Thomas deLeyburn, and died 12 Aug 1315. [Burke's Peerage]

---------------------------------- 
Beauchamp, Guy de , 10th Earl of Warwick (I2543)
 
28 BIRT PLAC Of, Esztergom, Komarom-Esztergom, Hungary Hungary, Bela 1V King (I2096)
 
29 BIRT PLAC Of, Esztergom, Komarom-Esztergom, Hungary Hungary, Yolande of Princess (I2300)
 
30 DEAT PLAC , Villaneuva De Soria, Castilla, Spain


Alfonso IX, (b. 1171, Zamora, Leon--d. Sept. 24, 1230, Villanueva deSarria, Galicia), king of Leon from 1188 to 1230, son of Ferdinand II ofLeon and first cousin of Alphonso VIII of Castile, and numbered next tohim as being a junior member of the family, is said by Ibn Khaldun tohave been called the "Baboso" or Slobberer, because he was subject tofits of rage, during which he foamed at the mouth. Though he took a partin the work of the reconquest, this king is chiefly remembered by thedifficulties into which his successive marriages led him with the pope.He was first married to his cousin, Teresa of Portugal, who bore him twodaughters and a son who died young. The marriage was declared null by thepope, to whom Alphonso paid no attention till he was presumably tired ofhis wife. It cannot have been his conscience which constrained him toleave Teresa, for his next step was to marry Berengaria of Castile, whowas his second cousin. For this act of contumacy the king and kingdomwere placed under interdict. The pope was, however, compelled to modifyhis measures by the threat that if the people could not obtain theservices of religion they would not support the clergy, and that heresywould spread. The king was left under interdict personally, but to thathe showed himself indifferent, and he had the support of his clergy.Berengaria left him after the birth of five children, and the king thenreturned to Teresa, to whose daughters he left his kingdom by will.[Encyclopaedia Britannica, 1961 ed., Vol. 1, p. 688, ALPHONSO IX of Leon] 
Leon, Alfonso IX Fernandez King of (I3019)
 
31 MARR PLAC OF Chateau De Poiss,Yvelines,FRANCE King of France, Louis VIII (I2160)
 
32 NAME Henry II "Plantagenet" King Of /ENGLAND/

BURI PLAC Fontevrault Abbey, Fontevrault, Maine-Et-Loire, France
KING OR ENGLAND 1154-1189

Henry II was born at Le Mans in 1133. He was the eldest son of theEmpress Matilda, daughter of Henry I, by her second marriage to Geoffreythe Fair of Anjou. His parents' marriage was tempestous, and both partieswere glad when politics brought a separation, with Matilda going toEngland to fight King Stephen, and Geoffrey of Normandy to win a heritagefor young Henry.

He first came to England at the age of nine when his mother made herdramatic escape from Oxford where she was besieged by Stephen, across theice and snow, dressed all in white, to welcome him at Wallingford. Hisnext visit, when he was fourteen, showed his character: he recruited asmall army of mercenaries to cross over and fight Stephen in England, butfailed so miserably in the execution of his plans that he ended upborrowing money from Stephen to get back home. A third expedition, twoyears later, was almost as great a failure. Henry was not a soldier, hiswere skills of administration and diplomacy; warfare bored and sometimesfrightened him. For the meanwhile he now concentrated on Normandy, ofwhich his father had made him joint ruler. In 1151, the year of hisfather's death, he went to Paris to do homage to Louis VII for his duchy.There he met Queen Eleanor, and she fell in love with him.

Henry was by no means averse. To steal a king's wife does a great dealfor the ego of a young duke; he was as lusty as she, and late in their lives he was still ardently wenching with 'the fair Rosamund' Clifford,and less salubrious girls with names like 'Bellebelle'; finally, shewould bring with her the rich Duchy of Aquitaine, which she held in herown right. With this territory added to those he hoped to inherit and win, his boundaries would be Scotland in the north, and the Pyrenees in the south.

Henry was, apart from his prospects, a 'catch' for any woman. He was intelligent, had learned Latin and could read and possibly write;immensely strong and vigorous, a sportsman and hard rider who loved travel; emotional and passionate, prone to tears and incredible rages;carelessly but richly dressed, worried enough in later life to conceal his baldness by careful arrangement of his hair, and very concerned not to grow fat.

But now he was in the prime of youth, and in 1153, when he landed with alarge force in Bristol, the world was ready to be won. He quickly gained control of the West Country and moved up to Wallingford for a crucialbattle with Stephen. This was avoided, however, because in the preparations for the battle Henry fell from his horse three times, abad omen. Henry himself was not superstitious -- he was the reverse, a cheerful blasphemer -- but he disliked battles and when his anxious advisers urged him to heed the omen, he willingly agreed to parley privately with Stephen. The conference was a strange occasion: there were only two of them there, at the narowest point of the Thames, with Henryon one bank and Stephen on the other. None the less, they seem to have come to an agreement to take negotiations further.

That summer Stephen's son died mysteriously, and Eleanor bore Henry anheir (about the same time as an English whore Hikenai produced his faithful bastard Geoffrey). The omens clearly showed what was soon confirmed between the two -- that when Stephen died, Henry should rule in his place. A year later Stephen did die, and in December 1154, Henry and Eleanor were crowned in London.

Henry was only 21, but he soon showed his worth, destroying unlicensed castles, and dispersing the foreign mercenaries. He gave even-handed justice, showing himself firm, but not unduly harsh. A country racked by civil war sighed with relief. Only two major difficulties appeared: firs tHenry's failure in his two Welsh campaigns in 1157 and 1165, when guerilla tactics utterly defeated and on the first occasion nearly killed him; second was the reversal of his friendship for Becket when he changed from being Chancellor to Archbishop of Canterbury in 1162.

The quarrel with Becket was linked with the King's determination to continue his grandfather's reform of the administration of justice in the country. He was anxious for a uniform pattern, operated by royal justices, to control the corrupt, ill-administered and unequal loca lsystems operated by barons and churchmen. At Clarendon in 1166 and Northampton in 1176, he got his council's agreeemnt to a series of measures which established circuits of royal justices dealing with the widest range of criminal activities. The method of operation was novel,too, relying on a sworn jury of inquest of twelve men. Though not like amodern jury, in that they were witnesses rather than assessors, the assize juries were the ancestors of the modern English legal system.

Henry travelled constantly, and much of the time in his Contninental territories, for there were constant rebellions to deal with, usually inspired or encouraged by Louis of France. Henry was determined to keep the integrity of his empire, and to pass it on as a unity. To do this was no small task, but in 1169 Henry held a conference with the King of France which he hoped would achieve his objectives: he himself again did homage for Normandy, his eldest son Henry did homage for Anjou, Maine and Brittany, and Richard for Aquitaine. The next year he had young Henry crowned in his own lifetime. If anything could preserve the succession,surely this would, yet, in fact, it brought all the troubles in the world onto Henry's head, for he had given his sons paper domains, and had no intention that they should rule his empire. Yet a man with a title does not rest until he has that title's power.

Late in 1171 Henry had a pleasant interlude in Ireland -- escaping from the world's condemnation for the murder of Becket. He spent Christmas at Dublin in a palace built for him out of wattles by the Irish.

Meanwhile, Eleanor had been intriguing with her sons, urging them to revolt and demand their rights. Early in 1173 they trooped off to the French court, and with Louis joined in an attack on Normandy. Henry clamped Eleanor into prison and went off to meet the new threat. Whilst he was busy meeting this, England was invaded from Flanders and Scotland ,and more barons who fancied a return of the warlord days of Stephen broke into revolt.

Plainly it was St. Thomas's revenge, and there was no hope of dealing with the situation without expiation. In July 1174 Henry returned to England, and went in pilgrim's dress to Canterbury. Through the town he walked barefoot, leaving a trail of blood on the flinty stones, and went to keep his vigil of a day and a night by the tomb, not even coming out to relive himself. As he knelt, the assembled bishops and all the monks of Christ church came to scourge him -- each giving him three strokes, but some with bitterness in their hearts laying on with five.

It was worth it though, for the very morning his vigil ended Henry was brought the news that the King of Scotland had been captured. He moved quickly northwards, receving rebels' submission all the time. He met upwith Geoffrey who had fought valiantly for him, and commented, 'My othe rsons have proved themselves bastards, this one alone is my true and legitimate son.'

Returning to France, he quickly came to an agreement with Louis and his three rebel sons, giving each a substantial income, though still no share of power.

Richard set to work reducing the Duchy of Aquitaine to order, and quickly proved himself an able general who performed tremendous feats, such as capturing a fully manned and provisioned castle with three walls and moats to defend it. But the people were less easy to subdue -- they loved war for its own sake as their poet-leader, Bertrand de Born, shows wel lin his works: '. . . I love to see amidst the meadows tents and pavilionsspread; and it gives me great joy to see drawn up on the field knightsand horses in battle array; and it delights me when the scouts scatterpeople and herds in their path; and my heart is filled with gladness whenI see strong castles besieged, and the stockades broken and overwhelmed,and the warriors on the bank, girt about by fosses, with a line of strongstakes, interlaced . . . Maces, swords, helms of different hues, shields that will be riven and shattered as soon as the fight begins; and many vassals struck down together; and the horses of the dead and wounde droving at random. And when battle is joined, let all men of good lineage think of nought but the breaking of heads and arms: I tell you I find no such savour in food or in wine or in sleep as in hearing the shout "On!On!" from both sides, and the neighing of steeds that have lost their riders, and the cries of "Help! Help!"; and in seeing men great and smal lgo down on the grass beyond the fosses; in seeing at last the dead, with the pennoned stumps of lances still in their sides.'

These robust knights were actively encouraged by the young King Henry. He was handsome, charming and beloved of all, but also feckless and thoughtless -- far keener on tournaments and frivolity than the serious business of government. Then in the midle of his new rebellion he caught disentery and shortly died. His devoted followers were thunderstruck --one young lad actually pined to death -- and the rebellion fizzled out.

The young king was dead, but Henry, wary of previous errors, was not going to rush into making a new one. He called his favourite youngest son, John, to his side and ordered Richard to give his duchy into his brother's hands. Richard -- his mother's favourite -- had made Aquitainehis home and worked hard to establish his control there; he refused to give his mother's land to anyone, unless it were back to Eleanor herself.

Henry packed John off to Ireland (which he speedily turned against himself) whilst he arranged to get Eleanor out of her prison and bringher to Aquitaine to receive back the duchy. Meanwhile the new King of France, Philip, was planning to renew the attack on English territories,all the while the three, Henry, Richard, and Philip, were supposed to be planning a joint crusade.

In 1188 Henry, already ill with the absessed anal fistula that was to cause him such an agonising death, refused pointblank to recognise Richard as his heir. The crazy project for substituting John was at the root of it all, though Henry may have deluded himself into thinking he was playing his usual canny hand.


England, Henry II "Plantagenet" King of (I2043)
 
33 NAME Theobald "le Butzllen" Le /BOTILLER (BUTLER)/

BUTLER FAMILY HISTORY

The 2nd Butler, who died in France, married twice. Through his firstwife, Joan (daughter of Geoffrey de Marreis, Justiciar of Ireland), whoprobably died in childbirth, their descendant, the 3rd Earl of Ormondinherited further considerable estates in Ireland and England. Throughhis second wife, Rohesia, the 2nd Butler was the forefather of the Lordsde Verdon who, however, did not retain the surname Butler. It needed aKing to persuade Rohesia to marry a Butler! For in 1225 Henry IIIpersonally requested her to marry his "beloved Theobald le Botiller".[Butler Family History] 
Botiller, Theobald le , 2nd Butler (I2441)
 
34 NOTE KING HENRY II OF ENGLAND HAD HER IMPRISONED FOR 12 TO 15 YEARS BECAUSE SHE CONT FORMENTED STRIFE BETWEEN KING HENRY II AND HIS SONS Aquitaine, Eleanor of (I2060)
 
35 TITL [COUNTESS OF STAFFORD AND EU]/ Plantagenet, Anne Cts Buckingham, Gloucester, Countess (I2556)
 
36 TITL [EARL OF HEREFORD]/ Bohun, Humphrey , IX, de H.G.,Earl (I2249)
 
37 TITL [EARL OF NORTHAMPTON (TWIN)]/

MARR DATE 1335 (LIC)
MARR PLAC Of, Castle, Badlesmere, Kent, England 
BOHUN, WILLIAM DE KNT GARTER EARL NORTHAMPTON (I2504)
 
38 Ancestral Roots of Sixty Colonist Who Came to NewEngland between 1623 and 1650 by Frederick Lewis Weis Affeton, Katherine de (I2445)
 
39 I wish I was sure of every name in this file & that I didnt
need to know what you think :) hey, but always refining this,
So if you spot a place where Im just flat wrong please tell
me or someone I didnt go on out with, I do this file out of fun and wanting to know, but do not
respond to the 'know it alls' , that dont have manners.I dont
consider them Kin!
Thanks and Happy Hunting!

Elizabeth de Clare, b. Tewkesbury 16 Sep 1295, d. 4 Nov 1360, daughter ofSir Gilbert de Clare (28-4) and Joan Plantagenet, daughter of Edward I,King of England and Eleanor of Castile. [Magna Charta Sureties]

----------------------------------------------

Elizabeth, sister and coheir of Gilbert de Clare, 7th Earl of Gloucester,daughter of Gilbert, 6th Earl and Joan of Acre [;m. (1) 30 Sep 1308 Johnde Burgh, b. c 1290, dvp 18 June 1313]. She m. (2) 4 Feb 1315/6 as (2)wife, Theobald de Verdun, Knight, Lord Verdun, b. 8 Sep 1278, d. 27 July1316; m. (3) by 3 May 1317 Roger Damory, Lord Damory, d. 13-14 Mar1321/2. She died 4 Nov 1360, age 65, leaving a will. [Ancestral Roots]

------------------------------------------------

He [John de Burgh] married, 30 September 1308, at Waltham Abbey, Essex,in the King's presence, Elizabeth, sister and coheir of Gilbert (DECLARE), 7th EARL OF GLOUCESTER AND HERTFORD, 3rd and youngest daughter ofGilbert, 6th EARL OF GLOUCESTER AND HERTFORD, by his 2nd wife, Joan, "ofAcre," daughter of EDWARD I. Elizabeth, who was born 16 September 1295 atTewkesbury, came to Ireland, 15 October 1309. John died v.p. 18 June 1313at Galway. His widow, who received the Honor of Clare in her purparty ofher brother's estates, married, 4 February 1315/16, near Bristol, as his2nd wife, Theobald DE VERDUN [LORD VERDUN], who died 27 July followingand was buried 19 September at Croxden Abbey, Staffs. She married, 3rdly,before 3 May 1317, Roger DAMORY [LORD DAMORY], who died 13 or 14 March1321/2. She died 4 November 1360, aged 65. M.I. to her and her 3rdhusband in St. Mary's, Ware. Will, desiring burial in the Convent of theMinoresses without Aldgate, London, dated 25 September 1355, proved 3December 1360.] [Complete Peerage XII/2:177-8, (transcribed by DaveUtzinger)]

-------------------------

He [Roger Damory] married, about April (before 3 May) 1317, Elizabeth 3rdsister of the whole blood and coheir of Gilbert EARL OF GLOUCESTER ANDHERTFORD, daughter of Gilbert (DE CLARE), EARL OF GLOUCESTER ANDHERTFORD, by his 2nd wife, Joan OF ACRE, daughter of KING EDWAID I. Shehad married, 1stly, 30 September 1308, at Waltham Abbey, in the King'spresence, John DE BURGH (son and heir apparent of Richard, EARL OFULSTER), who died v.p., 18 June 1313, at Galway; and, 2ndly, as 2nd wife,4 February 1315/6, near Bristol, against the King's will and without hislicence, Sir Theo bald DE VERDUN, of Alton, co. Stafford [LORD VERDUN],who died at Alton Castle, 27 July, and was buried 19 September 1316, inCroxden Abbey. She, who had livery of her dower, 6 December 1316, had,with her 3rd husband, livery of the knights' fees and advowsons of hersaid dower, 26 June, of her dower [IRL], 26 September, and, the Kinghaving taken his fealty 22 May, of her inheritance, 15 November 1317. Hedied 13 or 14 March 1321/2, at Tutbury Castle, and was buried in St.Mary's, Ware. On 16 March his widow was imprisoned in the Abbey ofBarking, and there, under duress and fear of death for herself and herson, was forced to grant her lordships in Wales to the younger Despenserand his wife. She had livery of her inheritance in England and Ireland, 2November 1322. At Christmas following, at the instigation of the youngerDespenser, she was placed under arrest at York, till she signed a bond bywhich she undertook not to marry nor to dispose of any of her landswithout the King's licence, on pain of forfeiting all she possessed . Herlands were taken into the King's hand, 7 January 1322/3, as she had leftthe King without his licence. They were restored to her, 17 February1326/7, and the King took her homage therefore, 20 December 1327. Sheendowed University Hall, Cambridge, 8 April 1336, becoming Founderthereof, 6 April 1338. Founder (lic. 1 February 1346/7) of a House ofFriars: Minors at Walsingham, Norfolk. She, who was aged 19 or 20 at herbrother's death in 1314, died 4 November 1360, and was buried, with her3rd husband, in St. Mary's, Ware. [Complete Peerage IV:42-45,(transcribed by Dave Utzinger)]

Elizabeth de Clare, b. Tewkesbury 16 Sep 1295, d. 4 Nov 1360, daughter of Sir Gilbert de Clare (28-4) and Joan Plantagenet, daughter of Edward I, King of England and Eleanor of Castile. [Magna Charta Sureties]

Elizabeth, sister and coheir of Gilbert de Clare, 7th Earl of Gloucester, daughter of Gilbert, 6th Earl and Joan of Acre [;m. (1) 30 Sep 1308 John de Burgh, b. c 1290, dvp 18 June 1313]. She m. (2) 4 Feb 1315/6 as (2) wife, Theobald de Verdun, Knight, Lord Verdun, b. 8 Sep 1278, d. 27 July 1316; m. (3) by 3 May 1317 Roger Damory, Lord Damory, d. 13-14 Mar 1321/2. She died 4 Nov 1360, age 65, leaving a will. [Ancestral Roots]

He [John de Burgh] married, 30 September 1308, at Waltham Abbey, Essex, in the King's presence, Elizabeth, sister and coheir of Gilbert (DE CLARE), 7th EARL OF GLOUCESTER AND HERTFORD, 3rd and youngest daughter of Gilbert, 6th EARL OF GLOUCESTER AND HERTFORD, by his 2nd wife, Joan, "of Acre," daughter of EDWARD I. Elizabeth, who was born 16 September 1295 at Tewkesbury, came to Ireland, 15 October 1309. John died v.p. 18 June 1313 at Galway. His widow, who received the Honor of Clare in her purparty of her brother's estates, married, 4 February 1315/16, near Bristol, as his 2nd wife, Theobald DE VERDUN [LORD VERDUN], who died 27 July following and was buried 19 September at Croxden Abbey, Staffs. She married, 3rdly, before 3 May 1317, Roger DAMORY [LORD DAMORY], who died 13 or 14 March 1321/2. She died 4 November 1360, aged 65. M.I. to her and her 3rd husband in St. Mary's, Ware. Will, desiring burial in the Convent of the Minoresses without Aldgate, London, dated 25 September 1355, proved 3 December 1360.] [Complete Peerage XII/2:177-8, (transcribed by Dave Utzinger)]

He [Roger Damory] married, about April (before 3 May) 1317, Elizabeth 3rd sister of the whole blood and coheir of Gilbert EARL OF GLOUCESTER AND HERTFORD, daughter of Gilbert (DE CLARE), EARL OF GLOUCESTER AND HERTFORD, by his 2nd wife, Joan OF ACRE, daughter of KING EDWAID I. She had married, 1stly, 30 September 1308, at Waltham Abbey, in the King's presence, John DE BURGH (son and heir apparent of Richard, EARL OF ULSTER), who died v.p., 18 June 1313, at Galway; and, 2ndly, as 2nd wife, 4 February 1315/6, near Bristol, against the King's will and without his licence, Sir Theo bald DE VERDUN, of Alton, co. Stafford [LORD VERDUN], who died at Alton Castle, 27 July, and was buried 19 September 1316, in Croxden Abbey. She, who had livery of her dower, 6 December 1316, had, with her 3rd husband, livery of the knights' fees and advowsons of her said dower, 26 June, of her dower [IRL], 26 September, and, the King having taken his fealty 22 May, of her inheritance, 15 November 1317. He died 13 or 14 March 1321/2, at Tutbury Castle, and was buried in St. Mary's, Ware. On 16 March his widow was imprisoned in the Abbey of Barking, and there, under duress and fear of death for herself and her son, was forced to grant her lordships in Wales to the younger Despenser and his wife. She had livery of her inheritance in England and Ireland, 2 November 1322. At Christmas following, at the instigation of the younger Despenser, she was placed under arrest at York, till she signed a bond by which she undertook not to marry nor to dispose of any of her lands without the King's licence, on pain of forfeiting all she possessed . Her lands were taken into the King's hand, 7 January 1322/3, as she had left the King without his licence. They were restored to her, 17 February 1326/7, and the King took her homage therefore, 20 December 1327. She endowed University Hall, Cambridge, 8 April 1336, becoming Founder thereof, 6 April 1338. Founder (lic. 1 February 1346/7) of a House of Friars: Minors at Walsingham, Norfolk. She, who was aged 19 or 20 at her brother's death in 1314, died 4 November 1360, and was buried, with her 3rd husband, in St. Mary's, Ware. [Complete Peerage IV:42-45, (transcribed by Dave Utzinger)] 
Clare, Elizabeth de Baroness (I2726)
 
40 I wish I was sure of every name in this file & that I didnt
need to know what you think :) hey, but always refining this,
So if you spot a place where Im just flat wrong please tell
me or someone I didnt go on out with, I do this file out of fun and wanting to know, but do not
respond to the 'know it alls' , that dont have manners.I dont
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Thanks and Happy Hunting!

Name also spelled Alianore. She was co-heir of her brother Gilbert. At his death at the Battle of Bannockburn, she inherited one-third of the Estate, the title to which went to her husband. She was age 13 at her marriage. 
Clare, Eleanore De countess of Angus (I2168)
 
41 I wish I was sure of every name in this file & that I didnt
need to know what you think :) hey, but always refining this,
So if you spot a place where Im just flat wrong please tell
me or someone I didnt go on out with, I do this file out of fun and wanting to know, but do not
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Sir Thomas de Monthermer, Lord Monthermer, born 4 Oct 1301, knighted1327, slain at battle of Sluys, 24 June 1340; married Margaret, died May1349, probably widow of Henry Tyeys, Lord Tyeys. [Magna Charta Sureties]

--------------------------

Thomas de Monthermer, Lord Monthermer, was constantly employed in themilitary service of the crown, his name, therefore, does not occur in theenrolment of the summonses to parliament. He was killed in a sea fightwith the French in 1340, leaving by Margaret, his wife, an only dau. andheiress, Margaret de Monthermer. [Sir Bernard Burke, Dormant, Abeyant,Forfeited and Extinct Peerages, Burke's Peerage Ltd, London, England,1883, p. 379, Monthermer, Baron Monthermer, Earl of Gloucester andHertford] 
Monthermer, Thomas 2nd Baron de , Sir (I2142)
 
42 I wish I was sure of every name in this file & that I didnt
need to know what you think :) hey, but always refining this,
So if you spot a place where Im just flat wrong please tell
me or someone I didnt go on out with, I do this file out of fun and wanting to know, but do not
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Castile, Urraca Princess of (I2340)
 
43 I wish I was sure of every name in this file & that I didnt
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So if you spot a place where Im just flat wrong please tell
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FITZHENRI, MATILDA PLANTAGENET PRINCESS (I2378)
 
44 I wish I was sure of every name in this file & that I didnt
need to know what you think :) hey, but always refining this,
So if you spot a place where Im just flat wrong please tell
me or someone I didnt go on out with, I do this file out of fun and wanting to know, but do not
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Thanks and Happy Hunting! 
Hardi, Marguerite Le Princess of France (I2444)
 
45 I wish I was sure of every name in this file & that I didnt
need to know what you think :) hey, but always refining this,
So if you spot a place where Im just flat wrong please tell
me or someone I didnt go on out with, I do this file out of fun and wanting to know, but do not
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Provence, Sancha Countess of (I2720)
 
46 I wish I was sure of every name in this file & that I didnt
need to know what you think :) hey, but always refining this,
So if you spot a place where Im just flat wrong please tell
me or someone I didnt go on out with, I do this file out of fun and wanting to know, but do not
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France, Marie Capet Princess of (I2180)
 
47 I wish I was sure of every name in this file & that I didnt
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So if you spot a place where Im just flat wrong please tell
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FERRERS, AGATHA DE (I2197)
 
48 I wish I was sure of every name in this file & that I didnt
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So if you spot a place where Im just flat wrong please tell
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Geneva, Marguerite [Ann] of (I2242)
 
49 I wish I was sure of every name in this file & that I didnt
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So if you spot a place where Im just flat wrong please tell
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Thanks and Happy Hunting! 
Clare, Margaret de countess of Gloucester (I2281)
 
50 I wish I was sure of every name in this file & that I didnt
need to know what you think :) hey, but always refining this,
So if you spot a place where Im just flat wrong please tell
me or someone I didnt go on out with, I do this file out of fun and wanting to know, but do not
respond to the 'know it alls' , that dont have manners.I dont
consider them Kin!
Thanks and Happy Hunting! 
Burgundy, Hugh 111 Duke of (I2338)
 

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